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Master Cutting-Edge Knife Techniques with Kimpton Chefs

Master Cutting-Edge Knife Techniques with Kimpton Chefs

Kimpton Chefs host a trio of culinary events

Chefs from Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants are sharing their knife-mastering skills and recipes at Behind the Apron…Dishing with Kimpton Chefs, a series of nationwide events that provide tips on slicing, dicing, and knife-maintenance techniques and recipes to guests.

See How to Become a Pro with Your Chef's Knife

Guests can enjoy a three-course lunch of oysters with Champagne; shallot mignonette; watermelon gazpacho with basil and mint; and butterflied leg of lamb with zucchini and goat cheese risotto and get the recipe for watermelon gazpacho at Mastering the Cut at Bambara in Salt Lake City.on Sept. 29. The event includes a wine-tasting and executive chef Nathan Powers shares some classic knife techniques, such as butchering, brunoise, and chiffonade.

Executive Chef Walter Pisano demonstrates how various knives slice, dice and chop at To the Point at Tulio Ristorante in Seattle on Oct. 11. Pisano demonstrates how to cut bread for panzanella and fish for crudo and shares his recipes for panzanella salad and Hamachi French kiss melon.

Executive Chef John Critchley teaches how to properly de-bone a whole fish and gives tips on how to scalp, filet, and cut it at The Fresh Slice at Urbana in Washington D.C. on Oct. 20. Critchley also demonstrates how to make crudo, tartare and ceviche. Guests get to sample the demonstrated dishes with marinades that are paired with wine. Each guest receives marinade recipes, a fish scaler, and jars of sauces, including salsa verde and ceviche marinade.

For those who can't travel to these events, the Kimpton chefs have videos featuring their hidden knife secrets.


The Best Ways to Sharpen Knives, According to Chefs and Knife Experts

We checked in with chefs and experts for their knife sharpening tips&mdashfrom easy-DIY tips to more professional methods.

“I like the Japanese knives, I like French knives. Whatever’s sharp,” Wolfgang Puck once said in an interview.

Knives are essential tools in every kitchen, but what do you do when yours start to lose their edges? We checked in with chefs and experts for their knife sharpening tips𠅏rom easy-DIY tips to more professional methods.

For those who prefer a DIY approach to knife sharpening, Claudia Sidoti, head chef at HelloFresh, has a few ideas to share, the first of which is using a piece of sandpaper: "The best size will depend on the knife and how much you want to sharpen it,” Sidoti says. She suggests starting with a coarser sandpaper and working your way up to a finer piece for maximum sharpness. Another of her methods is using a nail file, running the cutting edge of the knife blade against it.

  • Honeycomb Design Diamond Whetstone Grindstone Tool, $11 at amazon.com
  • Double Sided Diafold Sharpener Fine / Coarse, $34 at amazon.com

In a pinch, you can also grab a mug for sharpening. "Turn the mug upside down, find the raw part of the cup (the rougher part of the bottom), and run the knife across the mug until you get your desired edge," Sidoti says. She says that you will notice discoloration on the mug, which means the ceramic is removing steel and sharpening the blade.

Chef Jeff Osaka from 12 @ Madison in Denver is also a proponent of the mug method—he recommends slowly pulling the edge of the knife at about a 45-degree angle along the unglazed area. Chef Nicholas Tang of DBGB DC learned a similar technique from his grandmother, using unglazed base of a porcelain bowl instead.

“If I’m stranded with a painfully𠅊nd dangerously𠅍ull knife, say in an Airbnb, I use the non-sharp edge of one knife as a ‘steel’ to sharpen the sharp edge of another,” explains Chef Mary Sue Milliken of Border Grill in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. “Hold the sharp edge at a 15-degree angle to the dull edge and give each side a few swipes. It always make the knife better𠅋ut never makes it a sharp knife.”


Here, we’ve compiled a handy video guide that shows you how to cut 38 different fruits and veggies, many with cool shortcuts and hacks. In fact, some of these tips will cut your cooking time down so much, you might actually take an extended Seamless hiatus.

1. Cherry Tomatoes: This cutting hack involves two plates, and will basically blow your mind.

2. Onions: Chef Gordon Ramsay’s tips for doing the seemingly impossible–cutting onions without crying.

3. Avocados: If your avocado cutting technique is really just smushing the green part from the skin, here’s how to cut it into perfect pieces.

4. Mushrooms: Do it quickly—and perfectly—with these tips.

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5. Watermelons: Cutting this fruit can seem daunting, but it’s actally pretty easy to chop it into perfect cubes.

6. Eggplants: Martha Stewart’s guide for cutting an eggplant four different ways.

7. Mangos: Here’s how to cut a mango without wasting any.

8. Bell Peppers: This is how to cut a pepper into perfect slices.

9. Cucumbers: How to cut a cucumber quickly, courtesy of Jamie Oliver.

10. Strawberries: You’ll love this super=easy technique for cutting strawberries into perfect slices.

11. Apples: You think you know how to cut an apple–until you watch this video.

12. Oranges: This is how to cut oranges into perfect slices–perfect for fruit salad.

13. Pineapples: Don’t get intimidated by pineapples! Here’s how to master cutting it.

14. Artichokes: In just a few easy steps you’ll be enjoying fresh artichokes.

15. Celery: Cutting celery is easy. Cutting celery into perfect sections? Not so much. Watch this video, and you’ll be nailing it in no time.

16. Radishes: Learn how turn a radish into four perfectly cut pieces.

17. Broccoli: This is how to cut broccoli into perfect florets.

18. Zucchinis: How to cut zucchini to make it perfect for grilling.

19. Carrots: Learn how to dice, strip, slice, julienne, and chunk a carrot.

20. Peaches: This cutting technique teaches you where to make incisions on a peach so you can easily pull out the core.

21. Grapes: Use this cutting hack to cut a bunch of grapes in half, all at once.

22. Garlic: Cutting garlic properly requires using your hands. Watch the video to find out how to do it.

23. Pumpkins: This is how to peel, seed, and cut a pumpkin, and quickly.

24. Cantaloupes: Use this technique to turn a cantaloupe into perfectly cut cubes.

25. Figs: The good news? Cutting a fig the right way only requires one slice of the knife.

26. Pomegranates: You love pomegranates. Cutting them? Not so much. Here’s how to do it without a headache.

27. Kiwis: How to get the skin off, and then cut this fruit into perfect slices.

28. Lemons: This tutorial on cutting lemons will make you realize you’ve been doing it very wrong.

29. Bananas: This magic trick involves slicing a banana without peeling it first.

30. Plums: How to cut a plum in under ten seconds.

31. Asparagus: Learn how to dice asparagus the right way.

32. Cauliflower: Finally, learn how to cut a cauliflower the right way.

33. Cabbages: You probably think you know how to slice cabbage–until you watch this video.

34. Potatoes: Learn how to cut a potato four different ways.

35. Pears: You actually do this cutting hack using a spoon!

36. Parsley: Wonder how top chefs chop parsley so quickly? This is how.

37. Beets: Master cutting a beet into perfect slices.

38. Iceberg Lettuce: Not all salads are created equal, and a lot of it comes down to how you cut your lettuce. Here’s how the pros do it.


Welcome To The Cutting Edge Classroom Online! Homemade Tamales Virtual Cooking Class Roasted Pork Tamales Mexican Red Chile Sauce Pineapple Pecan and Coconut Rum Tamales Instructor: Chef John Alunni Demonstration/Hands On Saturday August 29th, 2020 5:00 pm EDT.

Welcome To The Cutting Edge Classroom Online! Janney Virtual Cooking Class Chicken Picatta Spaghetti Aglio E Olio Roasted Asparagus Garlic Bread Instructor: Chef John Alunni Demonstration/Hands On Wednesday September 2nd, 2020 6:00 pm EDT – ALL CLASS.


Master Cutting-Edge Knife Techniques with Kimpton Chefs - Recipes

On 11 January 2020, food magazines BEEF! and B-EAT held a joint competition in their show kitchen in Hamburg, Germany, seeking the ‘Master of Cutting’. Contestants were scored in three areas: speed, precision and creativity. Their tools: the Crafter and Epicure series from WÜSTHOF.

The expert jury, comprised of BEEF! and B-EAT Editor-in-Chief Jan Spielhagen, star cook Renato Manzi and our CEO, Viola Wüsthof, judged the contestants’ sharply honed knife skills. At the end of the demanding challenges, the contestants were pleasantly surprised to discover that, thanks to their outstanding performances, a total of three winners were picked! It was a competition, which demanded everything: On January 11, 2020, Hamburg’s BEEF! and B-EAT magazine was looking for the “Master of Cutting” in their show kitchen. The contestants were able to prove their knowledge in three disciplines: Cutting fast, cutting precise and creative cutting. Their tools: The Crafter and the Epicure series from WÜSTHOF.

An expert jury examined the concise cutting: BEEF! And B-EAT Editor in Chief Jan Spielhagen, star cook Renato Manzi, as well as our CEO Viola WÜSTHOF. Once the challenge ended, the jury glanced into happy and surprised faces. Thanks to outstanding performances, a total of three winners were picked! Ein Wettbewerb, der Food Fans und Profiköchen alles abverlangte: Am 11. Januar 2020 wurde in der Showküche des BEEF! und B-EAT Magazins in Hamburg der “Master of Cutting” gesucht. Dabei konnten die Teilnehmer ihr ganzes Können in drei Disziplinen beweisen: Schneiden auf Zeit, präzises Schneiden und kreatives Schneiden. Ihre Werkzeuge: Die Crafter- und Epicure-Messerserie von WÜSTHOF.


Degrees of doneness Very rare- 115-120 (very red and raw) Rare- 125-130 (large deep red) Med rare- 130-140 (bright red) Medium – 140-150 (rosy pink-red center) Med well- 155-165 (very little pink) Well – (no pink) Sous Vide Filet Mignon with Green Caper Sauce.

Chef John’s Basic Pasta Dough Yield 2 pounds raw pasta Ingredients Eggs 8 each oil, olive 1/2 fl oz salt 1/2 tbl flour, bread 3/4 lb flour, semolina 3/4 lb Directions Place the eggs, oil and salt in a.


Master Cutting-Edge Knife Techniques with Kimpton Chefs - Recipes

On 11 January 2020, food magazines BEEF! and B-EAT held a joint competition in their show kitchen in Hamburg, Germany, seeking the ‘Master of Cutting’. Contestants were scored in three areas: speed, precision and creativity. Their tools: the Crafter and Epicure series from WÜSTHOF.

The expert jury, comprised of BEEF! and B-EAT Editor-in-Chief Jan Spielhagen, star cook Renato Manzi and our CEO, Viola Wüsthof, judged the contestants’ sharply honed knife skills. At the end of the demanding challenges, the contestants were pleasantly surprised to discover that, thanks to their outstanding performances, a total of three winners were picked! It was a competition, which demanded everything: On January 11, 2020, Hamburg’s BEEF! and B-EAT magazine was looking for the “Master of Cutting” in their show kitchen. The contestants were able to prove their knowledge in three disciplines: Cutting fast, cutting precise and creative cutting. Their tools: The Crafter and the Epicure series from WÜSTHOF.

An expert jury examined the concise cutting: BEEF! And B-EAT Editor in Chief Jan Spielhagen, star cook Renato Manzi, as well as our CEO Viola WÜSTHOF. Once the challenge ended, the jury glanced into happy and surprised faces. Thanks to outstanding performances, a total of three winners were picked! Ein Wettbewerb, der Food Fans und Profiköchen alles abverlangte: Am 11. Januar 2020 wurde in der Showküche des BEEF! und B-EAT Magazins in Hamburg der “Master of Cutting” gesucht. Dabei konnten die Teilnehmer ihr ganzes Können in drei Disziplinen beweisen: Schneiden auf Zeit, präzises Schneiden und kreatives Schneiden. Ihre Werkzeuge: Die Crafter- und Epicure-Messerserie von WÜSTHOF.


As the most popular multipurpose kitchen knives, both the Santoku knife and the chef’s knife can be used for a variety of meal prepping tasks, from slicing meats and fish to chopping fruits and vegetables to mincing herbs and spices. However, the differences in design and the way each knife hits the cutting board require different knife skills and cutting techniques in order to use each knife to its fullest potential. For a better understanding of the differences and similarities between these two chef knives, let’s take a look at the specifications and uses for each.

What is a Chef’s Knife?

Often referred to as the most important tool in the kitchen, the Western-style chef’s knife comes with many uses in the kitchen. Designed specifically for the “pinch grip”, the double bevel blade measures anywhere between 8 and 12 inches long from the heel to the tip, while the cutting edge features a generous curve (known as the “belly”) and is designed for the rocking motion known in the culinary world as the “rock chop”. This technique involves anchoring the tip of your knife on the cutting board as you rock the knife up and down, using your guide hand (which should be in “claw position” with fingers curled under) to push the ingredient forward between each cut.

Different parts of the chef’s knife are used for different tasks as well. The heavy-duty heel of the blade is great cutting through thick slabs of meat and dense fruits and vegetables like squashes and melons, while the pointed tip is perfect for detailed work like scoring meat and trimming fat. Some chef’s also use the flat of the blade to gently crush ingredients like garlic.

Once you learn how to use different parts of the blade and master the skills needed to achieve different knife cuts, you’ll start breezing right through all of your slicing, dicing and mincing tasks just like the pros.

What is a Santoku Knife?

In the culinary world, Santoku translates as “three virtues” which is often used to define its three main uses: slicing, chopping, and mincing. Some chefs also say these three virtues refer to using three different parts of the blade – the main cutting edge for slicing, the heel for intense chopping, and the tip for detailed work – while others say it simply refers to its ability to cut meat, vegetables and fish. Whichever translation you prefer, the Santoku knife’s many uses make it a kitchen essential.

Crafted differently than the chef’s knife, the Santoku knife is lighter and smaller in size, with the most notable difference being the shape of the blade. Measuring between 6 and 7 inches long, the Santoku knife features a shorter, wider blade with a “flatter” cutting edge and curved tip versus the generous belly and pointed tip of the Western-style chef’s knife. This allows for more of an up-and-down chopping motion that requires lifting the blade off the cutting board between each cut (just think of that sound you hear when a chef is chopping through ingredients like a boss).

Another notable trait is the “Granton” or “scalloped” edge, which features indentations that allow tiny air pockets to get between the blade and your ingredients to help prevent them from sticking between slices. This makes the Santoku knife the go-to tool for creating perfectly uniform slices of fish for sushi and sashimi and for finely mincing delicate herbs, while the width of the blade is great for scooping up ingredients – just be sure to use the spine of the blade and not the cutting edge to avoid dulling your blade, and check out these other tips for following the rules of kitchen knife safety.

Although Japanese style chef knives are traditionally sharpened on one side (single bevel), double bevel Santoku knives have become more popular over the years. For example, the F.N. Sharp Santoku knife captures some of the same traits as our Western-style chef’s knife, with a double bevel edge sharpened at a 50:50 ratio (13 degrees per side) and a slight curve to accommodate the rock chop technique.

When to Use a Santoku vs. a Chef’s Knife

Many professional chefs and home cooks alike will use either knife interchangeably, but there really are some advantages to using one over the other.

The Western-style chef’s knife tends to be thicker and heavier, making it the workhorse for your kitchen, while the light-weight Japanese-style Santoku is perfect for fine, delicate slicing. Although both are considered multipurpose tools for slicing, dicing, and mincing fruits, vegetables and herbs, when it comes to the meats, the chef’s knife is more commonly used for cutting through thick cuts of meat and even bones, while the Santoku is the go-to for fish.

The chef’s knife may also be the right choice when cutting through dense ingredients like melons, squashes and other fall vegetables, while the Santoku should be your go-to for recipes that call for thinly sliced and perfectly uniform ingredients (think ratatouille).

When it comes down to it, choosing between the chef’s knife and the Santoku can also be a matter of personal preference and chopping style. Smaller-handed people might prefer the way the Santoku feels in their hands as it’s light, smaller and has a certain ease of handling, while people with larger hands may prefer the chef’s knife due to its heft. Either way, both knives have their uses in the kitchen, making it a bonus when both are included in your kitchen knife set.


3. Get Fired Up With A Blow Torch

Caramelized sugar is the (delicious) defining characteristic of desserts like Creme Brule. It looks super complicated but getting that end result is simple with a blowtorch. You can sprinkle sugar onto any sweet desserts, and even vegetables like roasted butternut squash, and melt it into a delicious caramelized topping. Knowing how to use a blowtorch gives you a chef-like status among your peers and is of the easiest kitchen tricks. Your secret’s safe for as long as you choose to keep it.


16. Frequently Asked Questions

How do I keep my kitchen knife sharp?

For peak performance and safety, you need to keep your knives at their sharpest. Simply put, a sharp knife will always do its best work — so you can, too!

First and foremost, give your knives a fighting chance by always using a proper cutting surface that helps protect the blade and keep it sharp. A wood board is best, and teak is among the kindest to your blade, like our sustainably sourced Teak Cutting Board.

For actual sharpening, the method you choose depends on the knife, the blade, your skills and your personal preference. But here’s a quick overview. A popular knife sharpener is a sharpening stone, AKA a whetstone, which is superior for sharpening at a range of angles and can handle a variety of knife types.

Another oft-used tool is the sharpening steel , known as a honing steel, which is fab for between-use sharpening but isn’t meant for long-term edge retention. A manual pull-through or electric knife sharpener will also help keep your knives ship-shape, and this type gives novice users the best chance to achieve pro-level results.

For a deeper dive on knife sharpeners, read our blog: Best Knife Sharpeners.

What is considered the most important knife in the kitchen?

Hands down, the most important kitchen knife is the chef's knife. It’s truly a jack-of-all-trades kitchen knife that tackles both heavy-duty tasks and delicate techniques with best-in-show results.

Slice a tomato? Check. Chiffonade basil? Check. Bone a chicken? Check. Dice a carrot? Check. Chunk a squash? Check. Carve a roast? Check. Mince garlic? Check…. You get the idea.

Keep in mind, a specialty knife is often better suited for a specific purpose — like a boning knife or a paring knife. But the chef knife’s vast versatility makes it every chef’s culinary wingman.

Do I need a knife block for my kitchen knives?

If you love your knives and want them to last, don’t toss them in a drawer willy-nilly without protection. Ever. There are several ways to safely store your knives — a knife block is just one. If your kitchen knife set came in a knife block you like and it fits on your counter where it gives you easy access, awesome, you’re all set. But if not, read on for the skinny on more options.

Keep your knives within reach with a magnetic knife holder, blade wall, block or wall strip, which does double duty for protection and as a brag board for your collection. A specialty drawer dock will also protect those edges while keeping your knives away from small hands, assuming you can add a child-proof drawer lock.

If your knives do live where they rattle around in a drawer, always use a sheath to protect the blade, your fingers and your investment.