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Kyatchi Brings Sustainable Sushi to Minneapolis

Kyatchi Brings Sustainable Sushi to Minneapolis


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New Japanese restaurant Kyatchi makes a commitment to the environment with sustainable seafood

Kyatchi's pressed mackerel and kombu sushi is made with only sustainable ingredients.

Kyatchi is not your average sushi joint–Minneapolis has plenty of those. You won’t find typical Americanized spicy tuna and California rolls at this new restaurant. Kyatchi dubs itself a “sea to table” restaurant, and has a mission to preserve the ocean and serve fresh, seasonal meats and fish sourced from family owned farms and local markets. Kyatchi does not serve any fish that isn’t deemed sustainable by the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s seafood watch, which is considered the measure for sustainability.

Their commitment to the environment as a whole even extends as far as providing a bike map to the restaurant on their website.

Since Kyatchi recognizes the importance of its ingredients, dishes are minimalistic and great thought is put into each element. A roll might contain nothing but pressed mackerel and kombu seaweed, or pickled plum and shiso leaves, but the flavors speak for themselves with no unnecessary adornment.

If sushi isn’t your thing, Kyatchi still has plenty to offer. Try a donburi rice bowl, organic chicken skewers, or one of the unique Japanese style hot dogs topped with raw vegetable salsa, curried cabbage, or avocado and egg. Additionally, Kyatchi offers a large selection of local beers, tea from Verdant Tea, and an impressive sake menu.


Kyatchi fills the void left by Tanpopo’s closing in St. Paul’s Lowertown

The chef's nigiri plate with sake, hotate, iwana, hamachi, bincho, masago, suzuki and a maki roll is served at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

A hot dog topped with yuzu mayo and grilled shishito peppers is served with a side of potato salad at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown. It is a new Japanese restaurant that offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Cauliflower nishumori with nira chive mayo, bonito flakes and lemon juice is served at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

A hot dog topped with yuzu mayo and grilled shishito peppers is served with potato salad at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown is a new Japanese restaurant that offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Tsukune, a chicken meatball skewer, at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Cauliflower nishumori with nira chive mayo, bonito flakes and lemon juice is served at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Black sesame panna cotta is homemade with sesame croquant and shiso leaf at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Sushi chef Jae Thao prepares a meal for a customer at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Kou Vang, left, and his wife, A Thao, share a sushi combo and seaweed salad at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The couple have been frequenting the new Japanese restaurant every two weeks since it opened. "I like it a lot," said Thao. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Server Aaron Martinenko, left, waits on customers at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Joseph Sawa of Chicago and his daughter Kendall Sawa of St. Paul review the menu as they dine at the bar at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. "We've been meaning to come since they opened, said Kendall. "So far, so good," she said of the sushi rolls they ordered. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

"There is no attractive way to eat ramen. You just have to slurp it," said Kendall Sawa of St. Paul, who tried the bonito broth with curry ramen at Kyatchi restaurant on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. Located at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown, the new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

The chef's nigiri plate with sake, hotate, iwana, hamachi, bincho, masago, suzuki and a maki roll is served at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul's Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

When Tanpopo closed in Lowertown, there was much hand-wringing among neighbors. Where would they get healthful, delicious Japanese food without having to drive?

Lucky for those residents, another Japanese restaurant moved in.

Kyatchi, with its much hipper vibe and focus on sushi, is very different, but still fills the niche.

The space, which had been sparse in that modern, Japanese way, has been transformed, with a bright mural, bamboo light fixtures, a sushi bar and another little bar at the back of the restaurant, at 308 E. Prince St.

The restaurant is similar to the original South Minneapolis location in look and feel, but it has one major addition — a Japanese whisky program, including cocktails.

Sushi chef Jae Thao prepares a meal for a customer at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul’s Lowertown on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Japanese whisky is hot lately, especially among the chef and bartender crowd, and Kyatchi is offering a wide selection, including flights to help you learn what suits your personal taste if you’re new to the spirit, which shares more in common with Scotch than most other whiskeys.

Sustainability, which also happens to be hip, is also a big focus at Kyatchi.

The fish served is all sourced from The Fish Guys, who also partner with Octo Fishbar just down the street. Their mission is to work with fishing partners and farmers who are committed to practices that don’t deplete the fish population, which is a good thing for those of us who enjoy it. The chicken and meat are cage-free and humanely raised, and even the tea they serve is organic and free-trade.

None of this matters if the food doesn’t taste good, but it does.

In fact, Kyatchi has quickly become a shelter from the storm, a place for reliable sushi and small plates, with good service. And so far, we’ve not had a problem getting a table.

Cauliflower nishumori with nira chive mayo, bonito flakes and lemon juice is served at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul’s Lowertown on Wednewday, Feb. 28, 2018. The new Japanese restaurant offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

Our favorite meal there was when we ordered the chef’s nigiri (sushi rice topped with slices of fish, $24) and the tataki roll ($17), which was plenty of sushi for three of us, especially when paired with some fun small plates, like the cauliflower nishumori ($7), which is deep-fried cauliflower served two ways, with a chive mayo, bonito (fish) flakes and also with a white sesame sauce and nori (seaweed). The raw fish was fresh and sliced well, and the rice perfectly cooked and seasoned. The roll was fun and tasty, too.

We were also big fans of the hot dogs ($10-$11). Hot dogs, you ask? Why, yes, it so happens that Japanese hot dogs are a thing, and they are delicious. These start with a smoky frank from Peterson Meats and are topped with a variety of things, from noodles to mushrooms to kicky shishito peppers and rich Japanese mayonnaise.

A hot dog topped with yuzu mayo and grilled shishito peppers is served with a side of potato salad at Kyatchi restaurant at 308 Prince St. in St. Paul’s Lowertown. It is a new Japanese restaurant that offers sustainable sushi and other tasty dishes. (Ginger Pinson / Pioneer Press)

In the noodle department, things were more hit and miss. While the sweet-salty kaisen yakisoba ($15.50), studded with caramelized scallops and crisp cabbage, disappeared fast, the ramen ($13) was lacking in complexity compared to other ramen shops in town, and the pork belly was rubbery.

They also have rice bowls, the best of which is probably the tsukune donburi ($17), mostly because of the succulent little chicken meatballs, which are also served separately, as skewers ($4.75). Our one complaint was that the poached egg on ours was overcooked so the yolk didn’t add any richness to the dish.


Kyatchi me if you can

The saba, three thin slices of mackerel, is part of the menu at Kyatchi, a new sustainable sushi restaurant that recently opened in Uptown.

Sustainability is one of the new millennium&rsquos top buzzwords, both as a trend and as a marketing tool. It&rsquos now seeping into every pore of our society, with companies as big as Levi&rsquos and Nike attaching the label to their products.

But it&rsquos sometimes the things for which sustainability is most pressing &mdash food, for example &mdash that don&rsquot make the cut.

One example is sushi. Though it became trendy around the same time that sustainability did, the two don&rsquot go hand-in-hand as often as they should.

Minneapolis, however, has seen a barrage of sustainable sushi restaurants open in the past two years, including Sushi Avenue&rsquos Masu and One Two Three (whose claims to sustainability are questionable, due to sourcing).

In mid-February, Kyatchi joined destinations touting the label, raising the question of whether restaurants follow through on their claims or are attempting to draw in foodies and health-conscious diners.

A gray area

According to Coastal Seafoods&rsquo general manager Tim Lauer, sustainability can be boiled down to &ldquoharvesting, growing or selling seafood in a manner that allows the continuation of those products.&rdquo

Lauer said he thinks customers too often believe sustainability is &ldquoblack and white,&rdquo when in reality it&rsquos based on a number of factors including locale, endangered species. status and purity of aquaculture (For example, farmed salmon escaping into the wild and mating with wild salmon diminishes genetic sustainability.)

The Monterey Bay Aquarium runs a seafood watch program that&rsquos considered a barometer for sustainability.

&ldquoThey use the stoplight system &mdash green, yellow, red,&rdquo said Keane Amdahl, Minnesota&rsquos State Program Administrator for Sustainable Seafood at the Minnesota Zoo.

Under the system, green is considered the best, and red the worst.

Seafood falling under the &ldquored&rdquo category is still served around town. Amdahl noted Bluefin tuna, an endangered species that&rsquos considered the &ldquolion of the sea&rdquo and is treated as a prized delicacy.

Amdahl said Japanese researchers are claiming to raise sustainable Bluefin tuna &mdash which are raised from eggs in pens &mdash but it&rsquos an oxymoron. For a fish that can weigh up to 700 pounds and regularly swims from Asia to America, it&rsquos tough to be ethically raised in confinement. It was served at Fuji-Ya until 2011, and it&rsquos currently on the menu at Origami.

The amount of fish required to make sushi is eye-opening. Sushi Avenue&rsquos CEO Nay Hla and Director of Marketing Steve Tomasini said they regularly order 60,000-pound shipments of tuna sourced from the Philippines, Vietnam and Indonesia.

For a seemingly large quantity of fish, it doesn&rsquot go very far it takes three pounds of fish to produce one pound of sushi.

The quality of the fish bought is unequal. Sushi Avenue ships frozen tuna off to supermarkets like Cub Foods to use for their sushi bars.

Hla and Thomasini said that despite this, supermarket sushi is composed of 70 to 80 percent sustainable ingredients.

Sustainable sushi at sustainable prices

There are sushi restaurants in Minneapolis that follow through on their claim to sustainability. Kyatchi is one.

Amdahl said Kyatchi buys their fish from Sea to Table, which means sourcing from small boat fishermen. The fish is packaged and sent to the restaurant the day it&rsquos caught. (But even then there are transportation concerns, given that Minnesota is landlocked.)

Perusing Kyatchi&rsquos menu under their dim lighting, no Bluefin tuna (or other fish of questionable sustainability) was to be found.

Instead, there was an abundance of fish earning high marks through Monterey Bay Aquarium&rsquos research, with mackerel and shrimp dominating the menu.

There are some menu offerings that raise eyebrows, such as eel, rated red by Monterey Bay. Further research is appeasing, as only eel that is farmed rather than caught is given this designation.

At the kitchen&rsquos helm is Chef Hide Tozawa, longtime chef at Fuji-Ya. Tozawa is an inventive seafood aficionado you won&rsquot find insipid California rolls or middling Philadelphia rolls here. And the menu isn&rsquot limited to sushi &mdash it also features ramen and Japanese-influenced hot dogs.

Start with the Kaiso salad. It features several variants of red and green seaweed, which are complemented by two large cucumber slices. The salad is finished off with dribbles of sesame sauce that provide agreeable oiliness.

The Ebi Mayo Roll is a Philadelphia roll on steroids. Instead of cream cheese, it&rsquos stuffed with cooked white shrimp and Japanese mayonnaise. The mayonnaise tastes like cream cheese, but has an airier texture and doesn&rsquot feel as heavy as Hellman&rsquos.

The saba was the star of the show. Three thin slices of mackerel are laid in a white ceramic bowl. It&rsquos strong without being fishy and is silky-smooth, proverbially melting in your mouth. Eat the shiso leaf garnishing the saba &mdash it&rsquos high in antioxidants and has a bittersweet taste that grows on you.

It&rsquos a tasty, affordable and sustainable restaurant worthy of a special visit &mdash not merely another destination capitalizing on a buzzword.


Kyatchi Brings Sustainable Sushi to Minneapolis - Recipes

Kyatchi is a real dream-come-true restaurant: in my neighborhood, great and friendly service, fun decor, amazing happy hour. and I haven't even mentioned the food yet! The menu has all sorts of delights, ranging from their signature sustainable sushi (including beautifully put together vegetarian options), comforting and well thought out noodle and rice dishes grilled starters and mains and hot dogs. Japanese-style hot dogs! Attention to detail is evident in the food - the miso soup and kaiso salads are truly the best in town. It's rare to find a restaurant that is both family-friendly and suitable for date night, but Kyatchi is just that versatile. Can't wait to try the Saint Paul location in Lowertown the Minneapolis Kyatchi is our true neighborhood gem and go-to place, though.

11 - 15 of 42 reviews

First time was outstanding.
Great sushi, great service, great RAMEN!
Loved the Ramen, fantastic broth with hints of spices and "Japanese" al'dente noodles.

Second time felt like the chef had left the building.
Sushi was soft/mooshy - not good.
Ramen noodles were soft(waitress took a long time?). + Yes she did take a long time.

Third visit.
Ramen = excellent.
Wait staff = excellent.
Sushi = so, so.
WTF, do I, expect, in South MPLS.
Better than most, beautiful outside seating in MPLS summer(Love it).
Best restaurant in the neighborhood(Dragon Wok#2 for Lo Mein, Run Away From Their Chow Mein. ).

This was our second visit to Kyatchi in Minneapolis.

At our first visit, we were seated at the back of the restaurant immediately next to the kitchen door and 3 feet from the prep kitchen. The place was busy with dinner guests. The staff traffic swinging through the kitchen door, plus the smoke and odors coming from the prep area covered us like a rain cloud. With no other table available, we got up and left.

But we were curious, driven by the great reviews we read. So, we tried again, requesting a table away from the kitchen and prep area. This time we were seated at the front of the restaurant. Perfect. So, we stayed and took the time to soak up what is Kyatchi.

Kyatchi Minneapolis is a conundrum. There are no shoji screens. There is no Noren gracing the front entrance. There is no shamisen or shakuhachi music to set the mood for a quiet, relaxed dining experience.

Its eclectic decor —with an odd combination of baseball jerseys, cloth hangings with ukiyo-e and other images, a large mural on one wall, and a full-length curtain at the entrance (presumably to keep out the cold when the front door is opened)— is not what one might expect for a highly-rated Japanese restaurant.

It's kinda funky. Very noisy. Very busy.

The staff is great very welcoming and appreciative of your visit. The oshibori provided as soon as you're seated is customary in Japan, but a rare gesture of welcome in Minneapolis, at least in my experience.

The menu is inventive and very much worth exploring. We had 3 dishes. A Kappa roll, which was delicious that include a surprise perilla leaf embedded in the roll, nicely tucked in under the thinly-sliced cucumber wrapping.

Chirashi is an Udon-sized bowl of rice topped with veggies and a variety of sashimi. It was excellent and very filling.

The Chef's Sashimi Platter was nicely presented but several of the fish pieces were not as fresh as they should be and rather spoiled the experience.

All 3 dishes came with a very small portion of wasabi and a request for more was acknowledged, but never delivered. We also ran out of soy sauce from the container that was less than 1/4 filled when we sat down.

Although we wish Kyatchi was more traditional in its decor, we will be back to explore more of the adventurous menu.


Popular sushi restaurant Kyatchi opening second location in St. Paul, replacing Tanpopo

After debuting Kyatchi in Minneapolis’ Kingfield neighborhood three and a half years ago, the team behind the sustainable sushi restaurant is expanding to St. Paul.

The second location of Kyatchi – the brainchild of siblings Sarah and Sam Peterson – will open in the former Tanpopo space at 308 E. Prince St. near CHS Field in St. Paul's Lowertown later this summer. Some of Kyatchi’s trademark features at its original venue include a large mural along one wall that incorporates Japanese baseball themes, and a handful of baseball jerseys.

“I’m excited to get to know our neighbors here in St. Paul,” Sarah Peterson said in a release. “Sushi, art and baseball – it’s a home run!”

The project, which is backed by mega restaurateur Kim Bartmann, will keep the same focus as the Minneapolis shop, with chef Hide Tozawa specializing in authentic sushi, karage (fried) and grilled dishes, along with Kyatchi’s signature Japanese hot dogs.

Unlike the original, the new spot will have a full liquor license, and offer a selection of Japanese whisky along with its local tap beers and wine line.

No exact dates have been announced for the opening. The Minneapolis locale, meanwhile, added a new lunch service on Saturdays and Sundays earlier this month.


DeRusha Eats (Live): Masu Sushi & Noodles

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) –Hugely successful in Northeast Minneapolis and at Mall of America, the people behind Masu Sushi & Robata are now opening another location in the southern suburb of Apple Valley. But Masu is dropping the robata and focusing on noodles.

“One of the hot food trends in Tokyo the last few years has been Abura Soba, or what we’re calling Abura Ramen,” Masu Corporate Executive Will Selin said. “It’s a brothless ramen served with toppings and a small amount of flavored or infused oil combined with soy or vinegar. We’re calling our version Abura Ramen since we don’t want guests thinking it’s specifically the buckwheat noodle of the same name – in Japanese ‘soba’ just means ‘noodle.'”

Masu Sushi & Noodle in Apple Valley has four versions of Abura Ramen on their menu: pork belly with bamboo, scallion, ginger poached egg and garlic soy ginger scallion with chicken, pickles, mushroom, nori and poached egg kimchi with beef short rib, poached egg, mushroom and kimchi and curry with chicken, corn, bamboo, scallion an poached egg. (See below for Masu’s recipe for Beef Kimchi Abura Ramen.)

In all, this noodle-focused suburban location will have 16 different noodle dishes to choose from, including soba, udon, traditional broth-based ramen and yakisoba.

The rest of the menu is organized into sections for izakaya (small plates), sushi, including makizushi (sushi rolls) and sushi assortments featuring only sustainable seafood, and robata, a traditional Japanese grilling technique.

Masu is owned by an Eagan-based company called Sushi Avenue, which is owned by brothers Nay Hla and Nay Lin. Sushi Avenue provides chefs, recipes, seafood and other sushi-related ingredients to upscale supermarkets, universities and foodservice locations across the country.

Masu Sushi & Noodles is located at 14638 Cedar Ave., Apple Valley, Minn.

Beef Kimchi Abura Ramen

Masu Sushi and Noodles is introducing one of Japan’s hottest food trends to the Twin Cities. Abura “broth-less” Ramen is hearty, flavorful comfort food any time of the year!

Ingredients:

  • Two Packages Fresh Ramen Noodles*
  • 6oz Kimchi – either homemade or from a deli*
  • 3 oz Beech Mushrooms
  • Two Poached Eggs **
  • 6 oz Thinly sliced Steak of your choice
  • Sliced Scallion, for garnish
  • Garlic Ginger Soy Sauce (see recipe below)
  1. Prepare Garlic Ginger Soy Sauce, set aside. (Recipe below.)
  2. Poach Eggs
  3. Grill Steak of your choice
  4. Sauté Mushrooms
  5. Bring water to boil, cook ramen noodles, stain and place in mixing bowl
  6. Dress the Noodles with 1/2 C prepared Garlic Ginger Soy Sauce
  7. Divide, dressed Noodles into individual serving bowls
  8. Place one Poached Egg in middle of dressed Ramen noodles
  9. Arrange Kimchi, Mushrooms and Beef around egg.
  10. Garnish with scallion.

*This ingredient can easily be found at Asian markets, such as United Noodle, and higher end grocery stores.

**To make proper poached eggs, first make sure your eggs are really fresh. Add a small dash of vinegar to a pan of steadily simmering water. Crack eggs individually into a ramekin or cup. Create a gentle whirlpool in the water to help the egg white wrap around the yolk. Slowly tip the egg into the water, white first. Leave to cook for three minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon.


United Noodles, Minneapolis

To describe United Noodles as a "grocery store" would be like describing Mall of America as a "shopping mall." It's both accurate and a dramatic understatement. Sprawling (but well-lit and clean), United Noodles is organized by place of origin, allowing shoppers to cruise the aisles for food from Korea, China, Japan, Thailand, Hawaii and more.

Visitors can marvel at dozens of kinds of rice, hundreds of kinds of noodles, oodles of frozen dumplings and cases of frozen delicacies, among other attractions, and can also catch lunch at the store's in-house diner. One of the house specialties is SPAM musubi, a try-it-to-believe-it delicacy that marries the beloved processed pork from Austin, Minnesota, with a sushi-like rice and seaweed presentation. It's deeply savory and one of the best lunch deals in town.


Former Tanpopo Spot Will Become a St. Paul Location for Kyatchi

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Kyatchi is bringing its skewers, minimalist and sustainable sushi, and Japanese whiskey to the former Tanpopo location in Lowertown. It’s set to open late this summer. If any restaurant would be a smooth transition from the thoughtful Japanese fare of Tanpopo, Kyatchi is probably the one. Details (via press release) follow:

WHO: Siblings Sarah and Sam Peterson plan to create a second Kyatchi location along with the rest of the team: Chef Hide Tozawa, and Kim Bartmann and Anne Saxton. Kyatchi’s focus on serving sustainable seafood (following the guidelines set by the MN Zoo Fish Smart, Monterey Bay Seafood Watch, and Marine Stewardship Council Programs) will remain a focus.

WHAT: Chef Tozawa creates traditional Japanese menus, including sushi, giving customers a chance to experience new items not usually found on Americanized menus. Guests can expect to see grilled meat & vegetable skewers, seasonally driven items such as traditional Donburi rice & vegetable bowls and an assortment of small plates. Expect Kyatchi to utilize ingredients from the neighboring St. Paul Farmers Market. Kyatchi’s award-winning hot dogs will also remain a key part of the menu.

Kyatchi will have a warm and casual atmosphere and the team is excited to offer a full selection of sake & Japanese whiskey, along with its local brews on tap and wine list. The larger space will allow for private parties.

WHEN: Late summer, but we may throw a pop-up in there beforehand… Dates to be announced soon.


The Early Word on BoneYard and Kyatchi

This week in Week in Reviews, both Heavy Table's Jill Lewis and City Pages' Joy Summers head to Uptown's newest addition, BoneYard. While the Southern restaurant got a lot of flack early on for its kitschy menu (featuring "Mama-Mo" and "Pee-Paw"), both reviewers seem to say that, hey, it's actually pretty good. First, Lewis, who gives the restaurant two stars (out of four) and says that the restaurant "actually delivers on its promise of down-home, chicken-fried, sweet-tea-spiked cuisine."

Lewis recommends the chicken and waffles (the chicken is "succulent and juicy"), the St. Louis-style ribs ("meaty, flavorful, and give you a lot to nibble"), and especially the "insanely tasty cottage fries" that accompany each sandwich or can be ordered on their own as a side. The other sides are not so good: the grits are a "gluey, globby mess" and the coleslaw is "bland."

City Pages' Joy Summers hit up BoneYard for lunch, where she found some hits and some misses. The bacon-wrapped, fried-egg-topped, fry-accompanied duck meatloaf is a carpe diem hit the pimento-cheese-spiked mac and cheese is good, but "oddly sweet." The fried chicken seemed like it "had been languishing under a heat lamp for some time": "The skin and breading was still wonderfully crisp, but the dark meat below had shriveled."

Lastly, Heavy Table's James Norton heads to Kingfield's newly-opened sustainable sushi spot Kyatchi, where: "The menu is some good, some great, some questionable, all interesting and all expensive." Highlights include the daily nigiri ("one of the best bites of sushi we've had in quite some time ") and the "flawless" udon. But he finds that the rice overwhelms the fish in the pressed sushi, whose high price tags "feel like an overreach."

Writing about the restaurant's surprisingly chewy seaweed salad, Norton sums up his experience at Kyatchi: "As is true of much of the restaurant's menu, you've got to go to it it won't meet you where you're comfortable. And for true lovers of food, that's no problem."
· All Week in Reviews [Eater MPLS]


Restaurants near St. Paul in Highland Park

There are a lot of small boroughs outside St. Paul with unique restaurants. Highland Park is right next to St. Paul, just a short 10-minute drive, and has an impressive amount of dining options.

From movie theaters, Tiffany’s sports lounge with beer specials and pub food, to high-class pre-set menus, Highland Park has a lot to offer to locals and tourists alike.

Joan’s in the Park

Joan’s in the Park offers an affordable pre-set menu that leaves an impression. Four courses that you choose, plated perfectly, served to you with a friendly waitstaff. And they finish it off with a splendid dessert. What more could you ask for?

If you are not into pre-set menus you can still order a la carte. But make sure you make a reservation. This is a small space so it is best to have your seat saved!

Bar Brigade

French-inspired food, champagne, and rose on tap. Sign us up.

Bar Brigade is a cozy space with a phenomenal menu. We particularly enjoy the wild boar bourguignon and lobster claw crepe. Yum. Their cheese selection is also perfect for a cheat day.

Bar Brigade also has an excellent happy hour. Finding a cozy bar with excellent food and a $6 cheese plate on happy hour. If that isn’t enough to convince you to try Bar Brigade, I suppose their lobster popover for brunch might just do it.

Caffe Biaggio

Last but certainly not least, Caffe Biaggio has the best homemade Italian food in town. If you are looking for classic Italian this is the place to go.

The space is made cozy by the smell of fresh garlic cooking in the kitchen. The wine list boasts some of the best Italian wines around. And the owners – and staff – are helpful and add the right bit of pizzazz to your meal.

The food? Outstanding. The spinach-basil ricotta in brown butter will have you licking your plate clean. The seasonal risotto always matches the freshest produce.

And on Mondays, they offer “date night” with a wonderful menu for only $60 per couple. Stop on by Caffe Biaggio, you will be glad you did!


Watch the video: Eiyo sushi bar - Review by efood (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Hugi

    the Useful room

  2. Mikabar

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  3. Kaiser

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  4. Krisoijn

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  5. Dewitt

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  6. Shakagis

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