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Frittata with Potato, Onion, Piquillo Peppers, and Chorizo

Frittata with Potato, Onion, Piquillo Peppers, and Chorizo


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Ingredients

Piquillo pepper vinaigrette

  • 6 drained piquillo peppers from jar or can (about 3 ounces) or 1/2 cup chopped drained roasted red peppers from jar
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

Frittata

  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup 1/2-inch cubes peeled red-skinned potato
  • 6 ounces chopped Spanish chorizo or other high-quality chorizo, casings removed, meat crumbled
  • 1/2 cup chopped drained piquillo peppers from jar or can or chopped drained roasted red peppers from jar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley

Recipe Preparation

Piquillo pepper vinaigrette

  • Combine all ingredients in processor and puree until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD Can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour before using.

Frittata

  • Preheat broiler. Whisk eggs, salt, and pepper in large bowl. Heat oil in large ovenproof nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and potato; sauté until potato is tender, 7 to 8 minutes. Add chorizo; sauté until well browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in piquillo peppers and parsley. Add egg mixture to skillet; cook until set on bottom and softly set on top, tilting skillet to allow uncooked egg mixture to flow underneath. Transfer to broiler; broil just until eggs are set, about 2 minutes. Run rubber spatula around frittata, then slide out onto platter. Cut frittata into 4 wedges; transfer to plates. Toss greens with enough vinaigrette to coat and serve alongside.

Reviews Section

Recipe Summary

  • 8 teaspoons olive oil, or as needed, divided
  • 4 ounces chorizo sausage, casings removed and meat crumbled
  • ½ cup diced green onion
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • ½ cup cooked long-grain white rice
  • 2 ounces goat cheese
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, divided
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 blood orange, zested and juiced
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper, or more to taste
  • 12 piquillo peppers
  • 2 tablespoons chopped almonds

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Brush a baking dish with 1 tablespoon olive oil.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Saute sausage, green onion, and a pinch of salt in hot oil until meat is browned and crumbly and onion is translucent, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from heat and cool for 10 minutes.

Mix rice, goat cheese, egg, 2 tablespoons parsley, garlic, cumin, 1 teaspoon blood orange zest, and cayenne pepper together in a bowl. Spoon rice mixture into each pepper. Place stuffed peppers in a single layer in the prepared baking dish. Scatter almonds over the top, drizzle with 1 teaspoon olive oil, and sprinkle with salt.

Bake in the preheated oven until stuffed peppers are heated through and filling is hot, 15 to 20 minutes. Drizzle 1 tablespoon blood orange juice, remaining 1 teaspoon olive oil, and remaining parsley over the top.


The onion

Slicing onions. Photograph: Felicity Cloake

Serious controversy even surrounds the inclusion of that most Spanish of ingredients, the onion. For some, introducing a pungent allium into such a delicately flavoured dish is a heresy tantamount to denying el Pulpo Paul's psychic powers. For others, well, it's utterly essential.

Using a recipe from Jenny Chandler's book The Real Taste of Spain, which declares vast quantities of olive oil "the key to an authentic" result ("weight watchers need not apply"), I make one omelette with a medium onion, diced, in addition to 700g waxy potatoes and 5 medium eggs, and one without.

Although the liberal use of oil (the vegetables are cooked in 300ml until tender, but not browned, and the omelette itself has a couple of tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil in it) saves the plain potato version from blandness, the onion, sweated down to melting softness beforehand, adds a sweetness which makes the other even better.


6 Spanish Ingredients to Keep in Your Pantry

At Morcilla in Pittsburgh, our #4 Best New Restaurant in America 2016, chef Justin Severino uses ordinary Spanish pantry staples to create bold, complex flavors. Inspired to do the same at home, we talked to Severino about how to cook with his favorite ingredients and brands. Find these ingredients online or at any Spanish specialty market.

This rosy pink jelly made from firm Spanish quince is usually served on a slice of Manchego cheese. Its flavor walks the line between sweet and savory&mdashtake advantage of its tang by mixing a spoonful into cocktails or condiments. We whisk it into the dressing of our Chicory and Asian Pear Salad with Membrillo Vinaigrette.

We like: Artisan Membrillo (Quince Jelly) from Cal Valls

You&rsquoll see these little fish speared with a toothpick as pintxos or draped over crusty bread and roasted peppers at tapas bars. Unlike traditional salt-packed anchovies, these mild white ones from the Basque region of Spain are pickled in vinegar, then packed in olive oil. Mince and toss them into pasta sauces or salad dressing for a silky mouthfeel. We love to layer them on Pickled Pepper and Boquerónes Toast.

We like: Anfele Boquerones

Spaniards eat these juicy, canned peppers stuffed with cheese as tapas. Don&rsquot mistake these fire roasted peppers for ordinary bell peppers: Their sweet, subtly smoky flavor adds a zing to cold cut sandwiches (hey, muffaletta!) and hearty soups. Packed in their own juices, just handful brightens up this Frittata with Potato, Onion, Piquillo Peppers, and Chorizo.

We like: Dantza Piquillo Strips

This imported pig from La Alberca, Spain has a rich nuttiness and a high price tag. Borrow this tip from Morcilla and, when you&rsquore not snacking on paper-thin slices of this fancy Spanish ham as it&rsquos typically served, save the scraps for enriching croquettes or this savory Serrano Ham and Poblano Corn Pudding.

We like: Bone-in Jamón Serrano by Fermín

The caramel notes from this fortified wine set it apart from cider or rice wine vinegar. Traditionally it&rsquos used to dress a salad or add a bright note to gazpacho. Severino suggests using the lower grade variety to quick pickle green beans the fancy 25-year-old stuff is ideal for splashing on fresh stone fruit or Wilted Chard with Shallots.

We like: Don Bruno Spanish Sherry Vinegar

Made from peppers slowly dried over an oak fire, the heat is less intense than Hungarian paprika but it&rsquos still unmistakably smoky. The earthy red spice is the most iconic Spanish flavor: It gives chorizo, paella, patatas bravas their deep, warm flavor. Sprinkle it into ground pork or fresh peaches to accent their sweetness. We like it as an addictive coating to marcona almonds.

We like: La Chinata Sweet Smoked Paprika


Spanish Potato and Three Cheese Frittata

  • Author: Tessa
  • Prep Time: 45 mins
  • Cook Time: 18 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 3 mins
  • Yield: 6 to 8 large portions 1 x

Description

If you can’t find saffron or just don’t want to shell out the cash for it, smoked Spanish paprika would also be delicious in this filling, cheesy frittata.

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil, divided
  • 2 medium Yukon gold potatoes, diced 1/2″ or just smaller (not peeled)
  • Kosher or sea salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • Large pinch of saffron (see notes)
  • 8 extra large eggs (about 10 large)
  • 1/4 C almond milk
  • 4 oz . garlic and herb or plain goat cheese, crumbled
  • 3 T finely grated parmesan
  • Up to 1/4 C of another harder cheese, finely grated (preferably a sheep’s milk, such a Manchego)
  • 1 T butter
  • 1/2 yellow onion, diced
  • 1/2 can California pitted black olives, sliced
  • 3 to 4 whole canned or jarred piquillo peppers, chopped small
  • 2 big handfuls mild greens (such as baby spinach)

Instructions

  1. In a large (10 inch), oven-safe non-stick or cast iron skillet, heat 1/2 tablespoon oil over medium. Add half of potatoes, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Pan fry potatoes for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, as you prepare the other ingredients. When potatoes are browned and pierce easily with a fork, remove to a bowl. Repeat process with more oil and remaining potatoes, leaving any extra oil in the pan.
  2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees (F).
  3. Combine saffron with enough of the hottest tap water to cover (about a teaspoon). Allow to hydrate for a minute or two. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, almond milk, all cheese, a small pinch of salt, a generous sprinkle of pepper, and the saffron mixture (water included) until combined. Set aside.
  4. Heat butter and last tablespoon of oil in the skillet over medium high and add onions. Cook until moderately browned, about 5 minutes. Add olives and peppers and cook until heated and any juices are gone. Add greens and cook until wilted, then stir potatoes back in. Reduce heat slightly, season with a little salt and pepper, and distribute veggies evenly in the pan. Pour egg mixture evenly over the veggies and return to medium high heat. “Jiggle” the pan while cooking for another 45 seconds, to help work the egg mixture down through the veggies.
  5. Place skillet just above center position in oven and bake 15 to 20 minutes, until puffed around the edges and nearly set in the middle. Cool in pan for 5 minutes, then use a small, thin spatula to loosen around the edge of the frittata. Tilt the pan about 45 degrees as you use a spatula to help slide the frittata out onto a cutting board or serving plate. Slice with a serrated knife just before serving warm or at room temperature.

Notes

To reduce prep time by 30 minutes, fry potatoes in advance and refrigerate. Alternatively, the smaller you cut the potatoes, the faster they’ll cook. You can also roast the potatoes in a hot oven on a sheet pan with olive oil, salt, and pepper to save time. I’ve tried both and achieved better golden color on the potatoes using the stovetop method.

If you can’t find piquillo peppers, substitute roasted red peppers.

To substitute smoked Spanish paprika, add the dried spice directly to egg mixture, without hydrating in water. Use about 1/2 teaspoon, unless you know you love the flavor and want a bit more.

To reheat frittata, it’s fastest (but not essential) to thaw it first. When making the fresh frittata, allow to cool, cut into quarters or smaller, and wrap each piece in foil. Open each piece slightly to vent, place on a baking tray, and heat around 300 degrees (F) until warmed through. To microwave, remove from foil and heat in 45 second intervals at 50% power.

Did you make this recipe?

Note: This page contains affiliate links. It does NOT contain sponsored content. Affiliate links (to products I recommend, on Amazon) offset my ingredient and website maintenance costs, so I can keep bringing you brunch-y recipes like this one. Thanks!


Full recipe & instructions: https://thethingswellmake.com/make-spanish-chorizo-dried-cured-fresh-varieties/.
Enjoy Spain’s signature sausage no matter where you live when you learn how to make Spanish chorizo at home. You can cook it fresh, as the Spanish would at a BBQ, or dry cure it and eat it sliced with other sliced meats and cheeses.

Knead the meat as if you were making bread. Fry a few tablespoons of the meat mixture and taste test it. If you think it needs more of seasoning, add it now. Remember it is.

Cook the chorizo for about 5-6 minutes in a large skillet over medium-high heat—you won&rsquot need any oil here. While the chorizo is cooking, heat the beans in a microwave. Once they&rsquore heated through, place them in the tortilla bowl. Drain the chorizo and place on top of the beans.

How to cook chorizo depends on what kind you&rsquore using. Cured chorizo doesn&rsquot require any cooking at all: Simply slice and eat! For raw and semi-cured chorizo varieties, you&rsquoll generally want to remove the casing (if there is any) and fry in a hot, dry pan until the chorizo is cooked through and the fat has rendered out.

This recipe is posted by request. Original recipe is by Charles G. Reavis. There are a few types of Spanish Chorizo. Sweet Spanish Chorizo calls for paprika, while the Spicy Spanish Chorizo calls for Cayenne pepper. This Version calls for Cayenne Pepper.

If you prefer the sweet simply switch out paprika for the cayenne. You should also note that Authentic Spanish Chorizo recipes vary from.Directions Dice the pork into smallish 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes. In a large bowl, use your hands to mix together the pork, salt, ancho, paprika, cayenne, cumin, black pepper, garlic, and oregano until everything is equally distributed.

Cover and refrigerate the chorizo mixture until you&rsquore ready to grind.Ease any air out of the sausage through the pinhole. If you want to eat the chorizo fresh, you are finished, and can either pan fry the chorizo until fully cooked, or cook it on the grill. To dry cure the chorizo, tie a cotton cord around the ends and hang it in a cool, dry place for several weeks.

Spanish chorizo, diced potato, and Manchego cheese are baked up in these bite-sized riffs on a classic Spanish tortilla. Most Made Today Quick and Easy Paella. Maria’s Classic Paella. Chorizo and Chicken Skewers. Mexican Paella with Cauliflower Rice.

Authentic Mexican Breakfast Tacos.Mix the dry seasoning ingredients together and then add the water and corn syrup to make a paste and place this in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. When everything is well chilled, mix the ground meat and seasoning together and knead the mix for a good 5.

Easy Spanish chorizo sausage recipe Cut and grind the pork and pork fat with a meat grinder. (Better if you freeze the fat earlier) Add the pepper, garlic, salt and cured salt (optional) and mix it all together.We tested four major brands (above, from left to right): Safinter, el Rey, La Chinata, and Chiquilin each in their respective dulce and picante offerings. The chorizo (recipe below) contained, by weight of meat: 2% dulce and 0.5% picante. All other ingredients, preparation, fermentation and.

Place the smashed garlic in a skillet with the oil over medium heat. Sauté for 10 minutes, squishing the garlic down to squeeze juice out as it cooks, until garlic is golden brown. Then remove and discard garlic. Sprinkle prawns with salt and pepper.Many traditional Mexican recipes call for the chorizo casing to be removed and the meat to be crumbled while cooking.

You can easily make your own chorizo at home. Bobby Flay makes chorizo to add into in his Spanish Tortilla with Chorizo, Piquillo Peppers and Gurroxta Cheese recipe Guy Fieri adds tequila and adobo sauce for an extra bite in.Cook chorizo in a hot skillet until done, or transfer chorizo to a resealable plastic bag and freeze until ready to use. I grew up eating chorizo—hard-cured Spanish chorizo, that is.

It wasn&rsquot until I moved to Oklahoma that I was introduced to Mexican ground chorizo.There are two main types of Chorizo, Mexican or Spanish. Both are made from ground pork and can be sweet or spicy, the Spanish version is usually dry cured where the Mexican is.This is a traditional recipe for pure Spanish chorizo.

Spanish chorizo is a dry sausage made from pork, pimentón, oregano and garlic. Pork is coarsely chopped and seasoned with oregano, garlic and its crucial ingredient the pimentón paprika which gives the sausage its deep red color.

List of related literature:

Crumble the chorizo into a heavy skillet and cook it over medium heat until browned.

Cook chorizo in skillet over medium heat, breaking up meat with wooden spoon, until well browned, 8 to 10 minutes, before adding onion and jalapeño.

Add the chorizo and garlic and cook, breaking up the chorizo with a spoon and stirring occasionally, until it&rsquos browned, about 5 minutes.

Heat a lidded cast-iron pot over medium-high heat and add 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of the oil add the beef, green onion–sausage, and chorizo to the pot and cook until browned.

Cook, stirring and breaking up the chorizo slightly, until it&rsquos completely cooked and lightly browned, about 15 minutes.

Add chorizo and cook until lightly browned, about 2 minutes.

In step 2, heat oil as directed and add chorizo mixture cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly crisp and no longer pink, 3 to 5 minutes.

Cook chorizo: Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to a deep frying pan or paella pan, over medium heat.

Add the chorizo and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the chorizo and cook while crumbling for 3 minutes or until cooked through.


Frittata with Potato, Onion, Piquillo Peppers, and Chorizo - Recipes

Simple entertaining with shop and serve tapas

– Story and recipes by Chef Heidi Fink Photography by Don Denton

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

Like Boulevard Magazine on Facebook and follow them on Instagram

Tapas: the traditional, Spanish style of eating small bites of flavourful food while sipping on adult beverages. It&rsquos a genius idea, and one that adapts well to home entertaining. Small plates, casual service, and delicious variety is the heart of tapas and the soul of summer entertaining.

Authentic tapas can run the gamut of simple cold dishes of olives and sliced cheese to more elaborate pre-cooked concoctions of tortilla (potato frittata), albondigas (amazing meatballs) and piquillo bacalao (roasted peppers stuffed with whipped salt cod). Although the cooked tapas are wonderful, the simple ones can still wow a houseful of guests.

My simple tapas entertaining idea comes from a crowd favourite in my Spanish cooking class: something I call &ldquoShop & Serve Tapas.&rdquo It&rsquos a collection of high-quality Spanish cheeses, meats, deli items, breads and nuts, arranged beautifully on platters and served as pre-class, or pre-meal, nibbles.

As a method of entertaining, &ldquoshop and serve&rdquo done right is easy on the host, stunning for the guests and delicious and filling. The trick is to source the right ingredients, plate them beautifully and throw in a few twists of your own.

I always start with a collection perfectly ripe cheeses that range from creamy and sweet to blue-veined. (If you are unsure of how to build a good cheese platter, see my tips below and enlist the help of knowledgeable cheese sellers at any of the delis in town.) I then add shaved Jamón ibérico or Jamón serrano (dry-cured Spanish ham), thinly sliced spicy chorizo and dry-cured wine chorizo. Round out the selection with delicious tidbits: marinated olives, warm spiced nuts, membrillo (aromatic quince paste), artichoke hearts, and piquillo peppers. These, combined with sliced breads, crackers, a full-bodied red wine or crisp white wine and a lovely table, make for a perfect storm of entertaining magic. Simple and fun for the hosts, inviting for the guests.

Victoria is lucky to have a number of wonderful delis to source authentic Spanish ingredients. See the list below of just a few great delis. A simple shopping trip, some fun playing with plating and garnishing, and possibly a few quick and easy marinades, and your meal is done. Impressive, delicious and a whole lot of fun!

Must-haves for Shop & Serve Tapas:

• Two types of olives (usually spicy Spanish from Charelli&rsquos or home-marinated Mantequilla olives plus a black olive)

• Quince paste: known as membrillo, this sweet-sour and flavourful paste pairs beautifully with cheese and blue cheese in particular

• Spanish salted almonds (see recipe)

• Three to six varieties of Spanish cheese (see cheese platter list below)

• Charcuterie platter with Jamón serrano and sliced dry cured chorizo

• Marinated piquillo peppers, marinated artichoke hearts, or other marinated vegetables of your choice (see recipes)

• Sliced baguette, crackers, rice crackers and other objects for holding cheese

• Anything else that strikes your fancy, including cooked tapas Tortilla Espanola (see recipe)

PLACES TO BUY SPANISH INGREDIENTS

HOW TO BUILD A CHEESE BOARD

Most important rule: Have fun and enjoy the different flavours, textures and aromas of the cheeses you have chosen. The information below has been provided as a guideline only &mdash there is no true right or wrong way to enjoy cheeses.

How to choose cheese for a platter

If you are unsure of where to start, enlist the help of the knowledgeable cheese sellers at any of the delis in town.

Select at least three cheeses that vary in shape, size and colour for a visually interesting platter. Choose cheeses of different textures: one soft, one firm, one crumbly, for example.

Choosing different textures will also take care of the next rule: choose cheese of different flavour profiles. Have a variety of flavours, from mild and sweet, to strong, sharp, creamy.

Aim to have at least two different milk-types represented. The most commonly available milk types are goat, sheep and cow.

Most of all, choose cheeses that you LOVE. Ask the cheese seller for samples and recommendations.

For more fun, choose a theme for instance, select cheeses from the same region or by the same cheesemaker. In this article, I built the platter almost exclusively from Spanish cheeses, most of which are firm, sheep-milk cheeses, that still provide an interesting contrast in flavours.

Make sure you have a large enough surface to fit cheeses comfortably with enough space between them so your guests can cut them easily. It&rsquos trendy right now to cram platters and boards full, with every available surface covered with garnishes, figs, charcuterie, pickles. While this looks stunning at first, it interferes with your guests&rsquo ability to serve themselves, and it disturbs the natural beauty of the cheeses themselves. Feel free to add small bowls of olives, fig jam, chutney, quince paste and anything else that would enhance the guests&rsquo experience with the cheese &mdash but don&rsquot go crazy.

MARINATED ROASTED PEPPERS

This recipe can easily be made with home-roasted peppers, if desired. But the small, sweet and flavourful Spanish piquillo peppers are available roasted in jars at a couple of delis around town and make an excellent addition to the tapas table.

1 jar roasted piquillo peppers, drained, sliced

45 ml (3 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil

2.5 ml (1/2 tsp) salt, or more, to taste

2.5 ml (1/2 tsp) sweet paprika, or more, to taste

15 to 30 ml (1 to 2 Tbsp) freshly squeezed lemon juice,

In a medium bowl, mix together sliced peppers, olive oil, salt, paprika and lemon juice, stirring to mix well. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 10 minutes before adjusting the seasonings (it may need more salt and/or lemon juice). This can be made up to two days in advance or served immediately.

QUICK-MARINATED ARTICHOKE HEARTS

I prefer to buy plain canned artichoke hearts and add my own lemony, herb-y marinade. Bright and fresh tasting, this is one of my favourite quick recipes.

1 can artichoke hearts (not marinated), drained, sliced thin

45 ml (3 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil

1.5 ml (¼ tsp) salt or more, to taste,

1 clove garlic, peeled and minced very fine, or pressed through a garlic press

60 ml (4 Tbsp) finely minced parsley

30 ml (2 Tbsp) freshly squeezed lemon juice

In a medium bowl, mix together sliced artichoke hearts, olive oil, salt, garlic and lemon juice, stirring to mix well. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 10 minutes before adjusting the seasonings. This is best made at least one hour before serving, and up to two days in advance. Just before serving, stir in the minced fresh parsley. The parsley will lose its colour if it is added too far in advance.

MARINATED OLIVES

500 ml (2 cups) Mantequilla olives, or other high-quality olive

60 ml (¼ cup) extra-virgin olive oil

8 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed

zest of 1 lemon, thinly sliced or grated

10 ml (2 tsp) fennel seeds, lightly crushed

2.5 ml (½ tsp) red chili flakes

Gently heat the olive oil with the garlic, lemon zest, fennel seeds and red chili flakes. Be sure not to cook it, just heat it up a bit to help release the flavours. Pour everything over the olives and let marinate for at least 1 day, and up to 5 days, before serving.

SPANISH SPICED ALMONDS

This is the best kind of a recipe: one that is very simple, but tastes VERY more-ish. Fried almonds (almendras fritas) are an authentic tapa in Spain &mdash the almonds are traditionally deep fried and then salted (always) and spiced (frequently) and served either warm or at room temperature. I have adapted the recipe to be pan-toasted in olive oil it&rsquos just as tasty and not so intimidating. I prefer the almonds while they are still warm – for a more interesting eating experience – but they are still delicious at room temperature. Feel free to play around with the spicing: add hot pepper, ground cumin or lemon pepper. I prefer them the way I have written it &mdash enough salt to make them snacky and a hint of smoked paprika for an exotic touch.

250 ml (1 cup) raw natural almonds

10 ml (2 tsp) extra virgin olive oil

1.5 ml (¼ tsp) smoked sweet paprika

a few grinds of black pepper

Heat a large skillet over medium heat for a couple of minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and add the two teaspoons of olive oil. Add the almonds and stir to coat with oil. Toast the almonds, stirring almost constantly, until lightly toasted, about 6 minutes (the nuts will start to give off a slightly toasted aroma, but shouldn&rsquot have any dark or black spots on them). While the nuts are toasting, keep an eye on the heat. Every stove is different. If the oil is smoking or the pan seems otherwise too hot, turn down the heat. If the nuts don&rsquot appear to be toasting, turn the heat up a bit.

Once you are confident that the nuts are lightly toasted, add the salt, paprika and pepper. Stir vigorously to coat the nuts evenly with the spices, and continue to stir constantly for another 30 to 45 seconds, until the spices are fragrant and the nuts are completely toasted. Immediately remove to a bowl and serve.

TORTILLA ESPANIOLA

I couldn&rsquot resist throwing in one actual cooking recipe. This delectable potato &ldquoomelet&rdquo is pretty easy to make and is absolutely one of the most famous and delicious of the Spanish tapas. Russet potatoes taste best for tortillas that will be served immediately. For a tortilla made in advance, use Yukon Golds.

125 ml (8 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil

568 gm (1¼ lb) russet or Yukon gold potatoes (about 3 medium), peeled and sliced into 3 mm (1/8-inch) rounds

1 small to medium onion, halved and sliced 3 mm (1/8 inch) thick

Heat a 10-inch ovenproof skillet (i.e. cast-iron) over medium heat. Add 30 ml (2 Tbsp) of the oil and the onion and sauté until onion is limp and translucent. Remove onions from pan and place in a bowl.

Add 75 ml (5 Tbsp) of the oil to the pan and add the potatoes with ¼ tsp of salt and stir to coat thoroughly with the oil. Sauté, stirring occasionally, with the pan covered at least half the time, until the potatoes are mostly cooked through, about 10 minutes. Remove potatoes from the pan to the bowl with the onion, leaving as much oil as possible in the pan. Turn off the heat.

In a large bowl, beat together the eggs with the remaining salt until eggs are evenly yellow and no streaks of unbeaten white remain. Turn the heat back on to medium.

Add the potatoes and onions to the bowl with the egg. Stir well to mix evenly. Add half of the remaining olive oil to the pan (15 ml, 1 Tbsp). Add the egg-potato-onion mixture and immediately reduce the heat to low. Cover the pan and let cook for about 8 to 10 minutes, until set and mostly cooked through.

At this point you can finish cooking the tortilla under the broiler, or do it the traditional way: use a thin metal spatula to loosen around the edges of the tortilla, place a plate over the top of the pan and, using oven mitts, invert the pan so the tortilla comes out upside down on to the plate.

Pour the last tablespoon of oil in the pan and heat over medium-low heat. Add the upside down tortilla and cook on the second side for 4 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the pan and let cool for 5 minutes before cutting and serving.

Platters, bowls, cheese knife, wooden scoop and shopping bag from Pigeonhole Home Store.


If you're looking for brunch recipes that really show you care, this impressive feat of pastry is the one. It's worth it to order special chocolate batons, so plan ahead.

Yes, there's iced coffee that's better than cold brew. And yes, it involves your cocktail shaker. Read all about our hunt for the best method below.

Since 1995, Epicurious has been the ultimate food resource for the home cook, with daily kitchen tips, fun cooking videos, and, oh yeah, over 33,000 recipes.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Epicurious may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


Frittata with Potato, Onion, Piquillo Peppers, and Chorizo - Recipes

Simple entertaining with shop and serve tapas

– Story and recipes by Chef Heidi Fink Photography by Don Denton

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

Like Boulevard Magazine on Facebook and follow them on Instagram

Tapas: the traditional, Spanish style of eating small bites of flavourful food while sipping on adult beverages. It&rsquos a genius idea, and one that adapts well to home entertaining. Small plates, casual service, and delicious variety is the heart of tapas and the soul of summer entertaining.

Authentic tapas can run the gamut of simple cold dishes of olives and sliced cheese to more elaborate pre-cooked concoctions of tortilla (potato frittata), albondigas (amazing meatballs) and piquillo bacalao (roasted peppers stuffed with whipped salt cod). Although the cooked tapas are wonderful, the simple ones can still wow a houseful of guests.

My simple tapas entertaining idea comes from a crowd favourite in my Spanish cooking class: something I call &ldquoShop & Serve Tapas.&rdquo It&rsquos a collection of high-quality Spanish cheeses, meats, deli items, breads and nuts, arranged beautifully on platters and served as pre-class, or pre-meal, nibbles.

As a method of entertaining, &ldquoshop and serve&rdquo done right is easy on the host, stunning for the guests and delicious and filling. The trick is to source the right ingredients, plate them beautifully and throw in a few twists of your own.

I always start with a collection perfectly ripe cheeses that range from creamy and sweet to blue-veined. (If you are unsure of how to build a good cheese platter, see my tips below and enlist the help of knowledgeable cheese sellers at any of the delis in town.) I then add shaved Jamón ibérico or Jamón serrano (dry-cured Spanish ham), thinly sliced spicy chorizo and dry-cured wine chorizo. Round out the selection with delicious tidbits: marinated olives, warm spiced nuts, membrillo (aromatic quince paste), artichoke hearts, and piquillo peppers. These, combined with sliced breads, crackers, a full-bodied red wine or crisp white wine and a lovely table, make for a perfect storm of entertaining magic. Simple and fun for the hosts, inviting for the guests.

Victoria is lucky to have a number of wonderful delis to source authentic Spanish ingredients. See the list below of just a few great delis. A simple shopping trip, some fun playing with plating and garnishing, and possibly a few quick and easy marinades, and your meal is done. Impressive, delicious and a whole lot of fun!

Must-haves for Shop & Serve Tapas:

• Two types of olives (usually spicy Spanish from Charelli&rsquos or home-marinated Mantequilla olives plus a black olive)

• Quince paste: known as membrillo, this sweet-sour and flavourful paste pairs beautifully with cheese and blue cheese in particular

• Spanish salted almonds (see recipe)

• Three to six varieties of Spanish cheese (see cheese platter list below)

• Charcuterie platter with Jamón serrano and sliced dry cured chorizo

• Marinated piquillo peppers, marinated artichoke hearts, or other marinated vegetables of your choice (see recipes)

• Sliced baguette, crackers, rice crackers and other objects for holding cheese

• Anything else that strikes your fancy, including cooked tapas Tortilla Espanola (see recipe)

PLACES TO BUY SPANISH INGREDIENTS

HOW TO BUILD A CHEESE BOARD

Most important rule: Have fun and enjoy the different flavours, textures and aromas of the cheeses you have chosen. The information below has been provided as a guideline only &mdash there is no true right or wrong way to enjoy cheeses.

How to choose cheese for a platter

If you are unsure of where to start, enlist the help of the knowledgeable cheese sellers at any of the delis in town.

Select at least three cheeses that vary in shape, size and colour for a visually interesting platter. Choose cheeses of different textures: one soft, one firm, one crumbly, for example.

Choosing different textures will also take care of the next rule: choose cheese of different flavour profiles. Have a variety of flavours, from mild and sweet, to strong, sharp, creamy.

Aim to have at least two different milk-types represented. The most commonly available milk types are goat, sheep and cow.

Most of all, choose cheeses that you LOVE. Ask the cheese seller for samples and recommendations.

For more fun, choose a theme for instance, select cheeses from the same region or by the same cheesemaker. In this article, I built the platter almost exclusively from Spanish cheeses, most of which are firm, sheep-milk cheeses, that still provide an interesting contrast in flavours.

Make sure you have a large enough surface to fit cheeses comfortably with enough space between them so your guests can cut them easily. It&rsquos trendy right now to cram platters and boards full, with every available surface covered with garnishes, figs, charcuterie, pickles. While this looks stunning at first, it interferes with your guests&rsquo ability to serve themselves, and it disturbs the natural beauty of the cheeses themselves. Feel free to add small bowls of olives, fig jam, chutney, quince paste and anything else that would enhance the guests&rsquo experience with the cheese &mdash but don&rsquot go crazy.

MARINATED ROASTED PEPPERS

This recipe can easily be made with home-roasted peppers, if desired. But the small, sweet and flavourful Spanish piquillo peppers are available roasted in jars at a couple of delis around town and make an excellent addition to the tapas table.

1 jar roasted piquillo peppers, drained, sliced

45 ml (3 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil

2.5 ml (1/2 tsp) salt, or more, to taste

2.5 ml (1/2 tsp) sweet paprika, or more, to taste

15 to 30 ml (1 to 2 Tbsp) freshly squeezed lemon juice,

In a medium bowl, mix together sliced peppers, olive oil, salt, paprika and lemon juice, stirring to mix well. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 10 minutes before adjusting the seasonings (it may need more salt and/or lemon juice). This can be made up to two days in advance or served immediately.

QUICK-MARINATED ARTICHOKE HEARTS

I prefer to buy plain canned artichoke hearts and add my own lemony, herb-y marinade. Bright and fresh tasting, this is one of my favourite quick recipes.

1 can artichoke hearts (not marinated), drained, sliced thin

45 ml (3 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil

1.5 ml (¼ tsp) salt or more, to taste,

1 clove garlic, peeled and minced very fine, or pressed through a garlic press

60 ml (4 Tbsp) finely minced parsley

30 ml (2 Tbsp) freshly squeezed lemon juice

In a medium bowl, mix together sliced artichoke hearts, olive oil, salt, garlic and lemon juice, stirring to mix well. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 10 minutes before adjusting the seasonings. This is best made at least one hour before serving, and up to two days in advance. Just before serving, stir in the minced fresh parsley. The parsley will lose its colour if it is added too far in advance.

MARINATED OLIVES

500 ml (2 cups) Mantequilla olives, or other high-quality olive

60 ml (¼ cup) extra-virgin olive oil

8 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed

zest of 1 lemon, thinly sliced or grated

10 ml (2 tsp) fennel seeds, lightly crushed

2.5 ml (½ tsp) red chili flakes

Gently heat the olive oil with the garlic, lemon zest, fennel seeds and red chili flakes. Be sure not to cook it, just heat it up a bit to help release the flavours. Pour everything over the olives and let marinate for at least 1 day, and up to 5 days, before serving.

SPANISH SPICED ALMONDS

This is the best kind of a recipe: one that is very simple, but tastes VERY more-ish. Fried almonds (almendras fritas) are an authentic tapa in Spain &mdash the almonds are traditionally deep fried and then salted (always) and spiced (frequently) and served either warm or at room temperature. I have adapted the recipe to be pan-toasted in olive oil it&rsquos just as tasty and not so intimidating. I prefer the almonds while they are still warm – for a more interesting eating experience – but they are still delicious at room temperature. Feel free to play around with the spicing: add hot pepper, ground cumin or lemon pepper. I prefer them the way I have written it &mdash enough salt to make them snacky and a hint of smoked paprika for an exotic touch.

250 ml (1 cup) raw natural almonds

10 ml (2 tsp) extra virgin olive oil

1.5 ml (¼ tsp) smoked sweet paprika

a few grinds of black pepper

Heat a large skillet over medium heat for a couple of minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and add the two teaspoons of olive oil. Add the almonds and stir to coat with oil. Toast the almonds, stirring almost constantly, until lightly toasted, about 6 minutes (the nuts will start to give off a slightly toasted aroma, but shouldn&rsquot have any dark or black spots on them). While the nuts are toasting, keep an eye on the heat. Every stove is different. If the oil is smoking or the pan seems otherwise too hot, turn down the heat. If the nuts don&rsquot appear to be toasting, turn the heat up a bit.

Once you are confident that the nuts are lightly toasted, add the salt, paprika and pepper. Stir vigorously to coat the nuts evenly with the spices, and continue to stir constantly for another 30 to 45 seconds, until the spices are fragrant and the nuts are completely toasted. Immediately remove to a bowl and serve.

TORTILLA ESPANIOLA

I couldn&rsquot resist throwing in one actual cooking recipe. This delectable potato &ldquoomelet&rdquo is pretty easy to make and is absolutely one of the most famous and delicious of the Spanish tapas. Russet potatoes taste best for tortillas that will be served immediately. For a tortilla made in advance, use Yukon Golds.

125 ml (8 Tbsp) extra-virgin olive oil

568 gm (1¼ lb) russet or Yukon gold potatoes (about 3 medium), peeled and sliced into 3 mm (1/8-inch) rounds

1 small to medium onion, halved and sliced 3 mm (1/8 inch) thick

Heat a 10-inch ovenproof skillet (i.e. cast-iron) over medium heat. Add 30 ml (2 Tbsp) of the oil and the onion and sauté until onion is limp and translucent. Remove onions from pan and place in a bowl.

Add 75 ml (5 Tbsp) of the oil to the pan and add the potatoes with ¼ tsp of salt and stir to coat thoroughly with the oil. Sauté, stirring occasionally, with the pan covered at least half the time, until the potatoes are mostly cooked through, about 10 minutes. Remove potatoes from the pan to the bowl with the onion, leaving as much oil as possible in the pan. Turn off the heat.

In a large bowl, beat together the eggs with the remaining salt until eggs are evenly yellow and no streaks of unbeaten white remain. Turn the heat back on to medium.

Add the potatoes and onions to the bowl with the egg. Stir well to mix evenly. Add half of the remaining olive oil to the pan (15 ml, 1 Tbsp). Add the egg-potato-onion mixture and immediately reduce the heat to low. Cover the pan and let cook for about 8 to 10 minutes, until set and mostly cooked through.

At this point you can finish cooking the tortilla under the broiler, or do it the traditional way: use a thin metal spatula to loosen around the edges of the tortilla, place a plate over the top of the pan and, using oven mitts, invert the pan so the tortilla comes out upside down on to the plate.

Pour the last tablespoon of oil in the pan and heat over medium-low heat. Add the upside down tortilla and cook on the second side for 4 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the pan and let cool for 5 minutes before cutting and serving.

Platters, bowls, cheese knife, wooden scoop and shopping bag from Pigeonhole Home Store.


Spanish Cooking Glossary

Adobo: A marinade for meat that usually contains smoked paprika (pimentón), garlic, and vinegar.

Albóndigas: Meatballs

Allioli: Garlic mayonnaise, the Spanish version of aioli. Served with paella, meats, fish, and grilled vegetables.

Arbequinas: Prized tiny, round, light brown olives from Catalonia.

Asado: Roasted or broiled meat.

Asturiana: Blood sausage from the Asturia region.

Azafrán: Saffron. A yellow seasoning made from the stigmas of a purple crocus flower. It adds color and distinct flavor to Spanish rice dishes, particularly paellas. Spain produces most of the world's saffron.

Bacalao: Salt cod.

Bisbe: A large blood sausage from Catalonia.

Boquerones: Mild white vinegar-cured Spanish anchovies.

Butifarra or botifarra: Popular Catalan white pork sausage spiced with cinnamon, fennel seeds, and black pepper. Also popular in Asturias. Butifarra negra is made with pig's blood.

Cabrales: A blue cheese from the mountainous northern Asturias region. One of Spain's best known cheeses.

Calçot: A spring onion similar to a large scallion or a small leek. Traditionally calçots are grilled outdoors during their short season and served with romesco sauce.

Caldo Gallego: A hearty one-dish stew from the region of Galicia, made with beef, beans, and greens.

Camaiot: A butifarra-like pork sausage from the Balearic islands.

Cava: Spanish sparkling wine.

Chilindrón: A cooked dish with a red pepper sauce.

Chorizo: A pork sausage made from lean pork, garlic, paprika, red bell peppers, and red pepper flakes. Not to be confused with Mexican chorizo.

Cocido: A hearty Spanish stew made with meats, vegetables, and beans, usually chickpeas.

Denominación de Origen (DO): Spanish laws that govern wine and grape production and the production of artisanal foods.

Escabeche: A cooked food that is marinated in vinegar-based marinade.

Extremeña: Blood sausage made with chopped meat, potatoes, and pumpkin from high plains.

Fabada: A famous bean and meat stew from the province of Asturias.

Fabes, fabas: Fava beans. The dried version of these large flat beans are famous in the province of Asturias.

Fideos:Noodles, usually thin vermicelli-type. A fideuá is a paella-like dish prepared with noodles instead of rice.

Gazpacho: A cold Spanish soup from the southern region of Andalucia. It is made with tomatoes, stale bread, vinegar, garlic, olive oil and water.

Jamón Iberico de Jabugo: Also known simply as Jamón Jabugo, Jamón Iberico, and Jamón Iberico de Pellota, it is the most prized serrano ham in Spain, made from free-range pata-negra pigs fattened on acorns, and cured in strict temperature-controlled rooms over 3 years. The caviar of cured hams.

Jamón Serrano: Cured mountain ham from Andalusian but used in regional cooking everywhere.

Jerez: Sherry. A fortified wine made from Palomino grapes grown in Andalucia near Jerez de la Frontera. Very popular as an aperitif. Sherries range in flavor from very dry to sweet.

Lomo: Cured pork loin.

Longanissa, longaniza: Pork sausage seasoned with paprika, cinnamon, aniseed, garlic, and vinegar.

Manchego: Spain's best known cheese, made from 100% sheep's milk in the central region of La Mancha.

Marmitako: A one-dish fisherman's stew made with tuna and tomatoes, from the Basque region.

Membrillo: Quince paste. Often served with cheese, especially with Roncal, Iberico and Manchego.

Migas: Fried bread morsels.

Mojo: A spicy uncooked, blended or mortar-pounded sauce typical of the Canary Islands.

Morcilla: Blood sausage stuffed with rice, paprika, onions, garlic, and spices. Used in Asturias.

Ñora pepper: A small red bell pepper that is used dried in soups, sauces (particularly romesco sauce), stews and rice dishes.

Padrón peppers: A small green pepper grown in Galicia. They have a strong sweet flavor, but 1 out of 50 is hot.

Paella: Spain's best-known rice dish, from the region of Valencia, made with short-grain rice in a wide flat pan also called a paella. Authentic paella Valenciana is made with chicken and rabbit. The paellas we are more familiar with contain seafood.

Pebrella: Wild Spanish thyme, grown in Southeastern Spain between Vallencia and Alicante. Thyme or oregano may be substituted.

Picual olive: An Andalusian olive that produces more oil than any other olive in the world l, grown mainly in the province of Jaén.

Pimentón: Paprika. In Spain, it is often smoked.

Piquillo chiles: Long, triangular-shaped intensely sweet red peppers that are used throughout Spain but especially in the Navarro region. They are usually roasted, and are available canned from Spanish specialty stores and online sources.

Pisto: A ratatouille-like vegetable stew made with olive oil, summer squash, onions, tomatoes, and peppers. A specialty of the La Mancha region.

Romesco sauce: A blended, pungent nut-thickened sauce made with roasted peppers and tomatoes.

Salchichón: Smoked sausage made from chopped lean pork and pork fat, salt and black pepper. Known as llonganissa in Catalonia and the Balearic Islands. Also made from acorn-fed pigs (salchichón Iberico).

Salmorejo: A cold soup, much like a gazpacho but thicker, and made mainly with tomatoes and bread.

Sobrasada, sobrassada: Majorcan pork sausage, very soft, flavored with garlic and paprika.

Sofrito: A flavor base for many dishes, made by cooking down a mixture of aromatics such as onion, garlic, and tomato in olive oil until very soft and fragrant.

Tapas: Small plates of foods served all over Spain as appetizers.

Tempranillo: A red grape used widely in wine-making, especially in the Rioja region.

Tortilla: In Spain a tortilla is a flat omelet, the equivalent of an Italian frittata. Tortilla Española, Spain's national dish, is filled with potatoes and onions.



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