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9 Food Escapes in Popular Vacation Spots

9 Food Escapes in Popular Vacation Spots


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When the all-inclusive resort excludes great food, break out on a culinary adventure.

Istock/sashbuzko

St. Thomas

Sun-drenched tropical getaway or ski trip in the snow-kissed mountains, experiencing the local cuisine is something that we always look forward to. An all-inclusive resort can be tempting because it promises unlimited food and drinks at a discounted price, and when the day's biggest chore is choosing a chaise lounge, a resort like this seems like the perfect choice for maximum relaxation.

On the flip side, all that blissful laziness comes at a price. More often than not, the food at all-inclusives -- or most resorts for that matter -- tends to be less than ideal and quickly becomes repetitive. Instead of tasting local ingredients and flavors, you end up with soggy lettuce and watered-down drinks.

A great meal can make a vacation, just as a week of bad meals can break it. So to ensure that you have at least one amazing food experience during your trip, we’ve rounded up some local, off-the-beaten path restaurants and food stops to visit when you need to escape from your resort.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.


8 Food Safety Tips When Traveling Abroad

Your travel plans are set. Your passport is ready. But, do you know what might be lurking in the food on your plate as you travel outside the U.S.?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 3,000 people die each year of foodborne diseases in America. The numbers are much higher in other parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that 2 million people die each year from contaminated food or drinking water. That&rsquos about 1 in 10 people! Risks range from:

  • Mild: travelers' diarrhea.
  • Serious: hepatitis A or typhoid, which can have long-term health effects.
  • Fatal: illness caused by harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses and chemical substances.

Food poisoning tends to be most severe in impoverished to low-income countries. It is most common in Africa and Southeast Asia. The death rates from foodborne illness are the highest in these countries. Reasons include unclean or unsafe water supply, poor personal hygiene and subpar food production and storage conditions. If you're going to a developing country, follow these tips &mdash even if you are staying at a five-star hotel.



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